Cornelius Herelle

Passionate about life, loving, grown, grounded, semi-educated, confident, secure, self made, fearless, optimistic but a realist. I am a well-traveled citizen of the world (over 170 countries). Always working for a better, brighter tomorrow. Working towards my prosperity. My experiences have shaped me, I am grateful for them. I am called a lot of names, I proudly answer to those that I deserve. I serve my family and my community. I am committed to my career, causes and passions. I have no master. God give me strength and wisdom to bear and make good use of my freedom; I am your child, I am my parents' son. I am myself.

The secret to Keynes’s eventual profits is that he changed his approach. He abandoned macroeconomic forecasting entirely. Instead, he sought out well-managed companies with strong dividend yields, and held on to them for the long term. This approach is now associated with Warren Buffett, who quotes Keynes’s investment maxims with approval. But the key insight is that the strategy does not require macroeconomic predictions. Keynes, the most influential macroeconomist in history, realised not only that such forecasts were beyond his skill but that they were unnecessary.

—Tim Harford. “How to see into the future.” (via peterspear)

emergentfutures:

Australia’s First 3D Printing Factory Aims to Shape Future of Manufacturing


Opening last Friday, the Advanced Manufacturing Plant, operated by local 3D printer distributor Objective3D, has more than 15 machines on hand ready to build parts and serve clients from a variety of sectors.

Full Story: Mashable

emergentfutures:

Australia’s First 3D Printing Factory Aims to Shape Future of Manufacturing

Opening last Friday, the Advanced Manufacturing Plant, operated by local 3D printer distributor Objective3D, has more than 15 machines on hand ready to build parts and serve clients from a variety of sectors.

Full Story: Mashable

emergentfutures:

Too-Big-to-Fail Banks Face Up to $870 Billion Capital Gap


Too big to fail is likely to prove a costly epithet for the world’s biggest banks as regulators demand they increase holdings of debt securities to cover losses should they collapse.
The shortfall facing lenders from JPMorgan Chase & Co. to HSBC Holdings Plc could be as much as $870 billion, according to estimates from AllianceBernstein Ltd., or as little as $237 billion forecast by Barclays Plc.
The range is so wide because proposals from the Basel-based Financial Stability Board outline various possibilities for the amount lenders need to have available as a portion of risk-weighted assets. With those holdings in excess of $21 trillion at the lenders most directly affected, small changes to assumptions translate into big numbers.


Full Story: Bloomberg

emergentfutures:

Too-Big-to-Fail Banks Face Up to $870 Billion Capital Gap

Too big to fail is likely to prove a costly epithet for the world’s biggest banks as regulators demand they increase holdings of debt securities to cover losses should they collapse.

The shortfall facing lenders from JPMorgan Chase & Co. to HSBC Holdings Plc could be as much as $870 billion, according to estimates from AllianceBernstein Ltd., or as little as $237 billion forecast by Barclays Plc.

The range is so wide because proposals from the Basel-based Financial Stability Board outline various possibilities for the amount lenders need to have available as a portion of risk-weighted assets. With those holdings in excess of $21 trillion at the lenders most directly affected, small changes to assumptions translate into big numbers.

Full Story: Bloomberg

Eat better. Run more. Squat more. Sleep earlier. Wake up earlier. Make a good breakfast. Drink water. Eat fruits. Read books. Adventure. Talk less. Listen more. Feel deeper. Love better. Open your eyes. Experience life. Be happy.

—my motivation to be happy. (via insignificantttt)

(Source: kindlyfading, via eatcleanmakechanges)

emergentfutures:

The age of loneliness is killing us


When Thomas Hobbes claimed that in the state of nature, before authority arose to keep us in check, we were engaged in a war “of every man against every man”, he could not have been more wrong. We were social creatures from the start, mammalian bees, who depended entirely on each other. The hominins of east Africa could not have survived one night alone. We are shaped, to a greater extent than almost any other species, by contact with others. The age we are entering, in which we exist apart, is unlike any that has gone before.
Three months ago we read that loneliness has become an epidemic among young adults. Now we learn that it is just as great an affliction of older people. A study by Independent Age shows that severe loneliness in England blights the lives of 700,000 men and 1.1m women over 50, and is rising with astonishing speed.


Full Story: The Guardian

emergentfutures:

The age of loneliness is killing us

When Thomas Hobbes claimed that in the state of nature, before authority arose to keep us in check, we were engaged in a war “of every man against every man”, he could not have been more wrong. We were social creatures from the start, mammalian bees, who depended entirely on each other. The hominins of east Africa could not have survived one night alone. We are shaped, to a greater extent than almost any other species, by contact with others. The age we are entering, in which we exist apart, is unlike any that has gone before.

Three months ago we read that loneliness has become an epidemic among young adults. Now we learn that it is just as great an affliction of older people. A study by Independent Age shows that severe loneliness in England blights the lives of 700,000 men and 1.1m women over 50, and is rising with astonishing speed.

Full Story: The Guardian

healthfitnesshumour:

Rope jumping is an excellent choice for exercisers of all fitness levels who want to improve their cardiovascular conditioning, coordination, agility, speed, strength, balance, rhythm, timing, and bone density. All you’ll need is a properly-sized jump rope, a suitable surface for jumping (a flat, firm surface with a little give is best; avoid grass, artificial turf, dirt, and sand), and a timer. If you’re new to rope jumping, keep these seven rules in mind:
1. Keep your elbows close to your ribs. 2. Don’t choke up on the handles. 3. Allow your ankles, knees, and hips to flex when you land. 4. Keep your jumps low. 5. Hold your hands waist-high. 6. Turn the rope mainly by rotating your wrist. 7. Turn the rope first, jump second.
This workout was created exclusively for Greatist by the pros at Punk Rope and can be scaled to challenge any fitness level by increasing or decreasing volume and/or speed.
The Warm-Up
1. Joint rotations: Do 10 reps each of shoulder rolls, torso twists, cross crawls, and heel raises.
2. Shadow jumping: No rope needed; just jump and rotate wrists as if holding a rope. Do 20 reps each of the following jumps: basic bounce, heel taps, scissors, and ski (how-to videos below).
The Cool-Down
1. Standing calf stretch, 30 seconds each leg 2. Standing hamstring stretch, 30 seconds each leg 3. Hip flexor stretch, 30 seconds each leg 4. Standing chest stretch, 15 seconds 5. Standing cat stretch, 15 seconds
Movement Demo Videos
1. 50 Basic bounce jumps  2. 50 Scissors jumps 3. 50 Ski jumps 4. 50 Heel taps

healthfitnesshumour:

Rope jumping is an excellent choice for exercisers of all fitness levels who want to improve their cardiovascular conditioning, coordination, agility, speed, strength, balance, rhythm, timing, and bone density. All you’ll need is a properly-sized jump rope, a suitable surface for jumping (a flat, firm surface with a little give is best; avoid grass, artificial turf, dirt, and sand), and a timer.

If you’re new to rope jumping, keep these seven rules in mind:

1. Keep your elbows close to your ribs.
2. Don’t choke up on the handles.
3. Allow your ankles, knees, and hips to flex when you land.
4. Keep your jumps low.
5. Hold your hands waist-high.
6. Turn the rope mainly by rotating your wrist.
7. Turn the rope first, jump second.

This workout was created exclusively for Greatist by the pros at Punk Rope and can be scaled to challenge any fitness level by increasing or decreasing volume and/or speed.

The Warm-Up

1. Joint rotations: Do 10 reps each of shoulder rolls, torso twists, cross crawls, and heel raises.

2. Shadow jumping: No rope needed; just jump and rotate wrists as if holding a rope. Do 20 reps each of the following jumps: basic bounce, heel taps, scissors, and ski (how-to videos below).

The Cool-Down

1. Standing calf stretch, 30 seconds each leg
2.
 Standing hamstring stretch, 30 seconds each leg
3.
 Hip flexor stretch, 30 seconds each leg
4.
 Standing chest stretch, 15 seconds
5.
 Standing cat stretch, 15 seconds

Movement Demo Videos

1. 50 Basic bounce jumps 
2. 50
 Scissors jumps
3. 50
 Ski jumps
4. 50
 Heel taps

(via eatcleanmakechanges)

There’s an interesting thing about ancient China, because if you read through the history, almost every single major invention of the world was invented in China first, and sometimes it took hundred of years for each to either it to make it’s way to Western Europe or to be reinvented in Western Europe. That includes paper, printing, steel, gunpowder, the compass, rudder, suspension bridges, etc. It’s almost everything, and for a long time China led the world in civilization because it was able to make these things long before anyone else. But there was one invention that China did not invent, and it would turn out to be the most important invention, and that was the invention of the scientific method.

There’s still a question about why China didn’t invent that, which was invented in the West. Because of that one invention, the West suddenly had a method for inventing new things and finding new things that was so superior that it just blew past all the great inventions of China and invented so many more things because of the power of this one invention. And that invention—the scientific method—is not a single thing. It’s actually a process with many ingredients, and the scientific method itself has actually been changing. In the very beginning it was very simple, a couple of processes like a controlled experiment, having a control, being able to repeat things, having to have a proof. We tend to think of the scientific method as sort of a whole—as fixed in time with a certain character. But lots of things that we assume or we now associate with the scientific method were only invented recently, some of them only as recently as 50 years ago—things like a double blind experiment or the invention of the placebo or random sampling were all incredibly recent additions to the scientific method. In 50 years from now the scientific method will have changed more than it has in the past 400 years just as everything else has.

So the scientific method is still changing over time. It’s an invention that we’re still evolving and refining. It’s a technology. It’s a process technology, but it’s probably the most important process and technology that we have, but that is still undergoing evolution refinement and advancement and we are adding new things to this invention. We’re adding things like a triple blind experiment or multiple authors or quantified self where you have experiment of N equals one. We’re doing things like saving negative results and transmitting those. There’s many, many things happening with the scientific method itself—as a technology—that we’re also improving over time, and that will affect all the other technologies that we make.

Kevin Kelly

(via stoweboyd)

(Source: inthenoosphere, via stoweboyd)