Cornelius Herelle

Passionate about life, loving, grown, grounded, semi-educated, confident, secure, self made, fearless, optimistic but a realist. I am a well-traveled citizen of the world (over 170 countries). Always working for a better, brighter tomorrow. Working towards my prosperity. My experiences have shaped me, I am grateful for them. I am called a lot of names, I proudly answer to those that I deserve. I serve my family and my community. I am committed to my career, causes and passions. I have no master. God give me strength and wisdom to bear and make good use of my freedom; I am your child, I am my parents' son. I am myself.
fastcompany:

Back-biting, gossiping, whispers about who will quit next — sounds like a nightmare work environment. But is quitting the only solution?
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fastcompany:

Back-biting, gossiping, whispers about who will quit next — sounds like a nightmare work environment. But is quitting the only solution?

Read More>

If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.

—Maya Angelou

*Glamour (via glamour)

(via forbes)

fastcompany:

Since way back when Romans ruled, ACs have evolved very little. Several companies are now on the case. How cool is that?
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fastcompany:

Since way back when Romans ruled, ACs have evolved very little. Several companies are now on the case. How cool is that?

Read More>

creativemornings:

"My idea of freedom is experiencing as much as I possibly can so that all the world feels safe to me."
— Joshua Cogan. Watch the talk.

creativemornings:

"My idea of freedom is experiencing as much as I possibly can so that all the world feels safe to me."

— Joshua Cogan. Watch the talk.

fastcompany:

The problem with wearables is that usually people stop wearing them. According to one recent report, one-third of users of activity-tracking wearables, like the Fitbit and the Jawbone, toss their devices aside after just six months.
To overcome this, a small cadre of companies has been furiously working to develop smaller, sleeker, more discreet devices that monitor health and wellness—in the form of temporary tattoos, band-aids, and ingestible pills.

Read More>

fastcompany:

The problem with wearables is that usually people stop wearing them. According to one recent report, one-third of users of activity-tracking wearables, like the Fitbit and the Jawbone, toss their devices aside after just six months.

To overcome this, a small cadre of companies has been furiously working to develop smaller, sleeker, more discreet devices that monitor health and wellness—in the form of temporary tattoos, band-aids, and ingestible pills.

Read More>

True leadership must be for the benefit of the followers, not the enrichment of the leaders.

—Robert Townsend (thinkexist.com)

(Source: goodideaexchange, via forbes)